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Daura Campos

ARTIST BIO

Daura Campos

Daura Campos is a Brasilian self-taught, multidisciplinary artist based in Belo Horizonte, Brasil. Merging photography, painting, moving image, sculpture, and performance, I create work that honors the experiences of sexual and gender minorities. Daura is a 2022 The Alternative Art School and FORGE fellow, she was a convener at the 2021 Hemi Convergence by the New York University (NYU) and the University of Chicago (UChicago).

Daura has exhibited her photographic work in Gallery TPW, Toronto, ON (2022), the Analog Film Photography Association, Orlando, FL (2022), Gallery 44, Toronto, ON (2022), Experimental Photo Festival, Barcelona, ES (2021), and others. It was also displayed on billboards in Times Square, NY (2021), Los Angeles, CA (2021), Chicago, IL (2021), and Toronto, ON (2021).

Her moving-image work was screened in South and North America at the Museum of Art of Pereira, Pereira, Colombia (2021), the Avant Garde Cultural Center, Bogotá, Colombia (2021), at the No Nation Art Lab, Chicago, IL (2021), and others.

Daura Campos

ARTIST STATEMENT

I am a multidisciplinary artist who defies traditional power structures around identity and artmaking through dissident bodies of work. Merging photography, painting, moving-image, sculpture, and performance, I create work that honors the experiences of sexual and gender minorities.

My work is a trauma survivor, it exists despite and because of how much damage it endured. My work is traumatized. My work is healing.

Via destruction and care, my process with 35mm film works through brokenness. The film and I make the work together, my process doesn’t only represent trauma, it creates it.

I submerge my exposures in toxic chemical solutions, boil them using ingredients that are familiar to me, bathe them in cold water, and let them rest in the sun for weeks. Is the water too cold? Is the sun too hot? Is the soup too lemony? I listen to their response and I adjust for their relief.

When encountering the artworks, survivors have a safe space to grieve, be visible, and have their experiences validated. At the same time, when interacting with the work they do the same for me, I grieve, I am visible and I am validated by their gaze.